The Connecticut River

Last Updated: 4/2016
General Description
 

Connecticut River Greenway State Park
         The Connecticut River Greenway, is one of Massachusetts' newest State Parks. It connects open spaces, parks, scenic vistas, and archaeological and historic sites along the length of the Connecticut River as it passes through the state. There are over 12 miles of permanently protected shoreline, and numerous access points to the river.
         Like jewels along a necklace, several larger properties such as Mt. Sugarloaf State Reservation, Norwottuck Rail Trail and the Great Falls Discovery Center (located in Turner's Falls) provide added visitor amenities.




Connecticut River Paddler's Trail
         The Connecticut River Paddlers' Trail is a series of primitive campsites and river access points spanning from the headwaters south to long island sound. While most of the river shore is privately owned, a number of generous landowners have agreed to host the public at primitive campsites on their land.  For a complete listing and more, click the button below:


STATISTICS

Total Length source to the sea: 410.0 miles
Length in Massacusetts: 67.7 miles 

         The miles are numbered from the mouth of the river to the Fourth Connecticut Lake near the Canadian Border.  There are several values given for the length of the Connecticut River.  We carefully measured and re-measured the length of the river using the USGS Map tool TOPO developed by National Geographic and found the a length of the river 410 statute miles.

Access Points
        We have carefully cataloged each access point and significant location.  There are many more locations that can be used but the list matchs up with the usable reaches described below:
 


Connecticut River Greenway State Park
Access Points
REACHES
        We have adopted the existing reaches used by the Connecticut River Watershed Council numbered from the headwaters to the mouth.  The reaches that pass through Massachusetts are listed below. Each reach has a map with put-in and take-out positions, description, length, difficulty, and information as appropriate.
Connecticut River Paddler's Trail
OTHER RESOURCES
 
The Connecticut Deerfield River Watershed Council
            The Connecticut River Watershed Council works to protect the watershed from source to sea. From alpine forests to tidal estuaries, rural farmlands to urban riverfronts, spotted salamanders to bald eagles and mussels to salmon, the Connecticut River watershed unites a diversity of habitats, communities and resources.
As stewards of this heritage, we celebrate our four-state treasure and collaborate, educate, organize, restore, and intervene to preserve the health of the whole for generations to come. Our work informs our vision of ecological and economic abundance.  See more at: 
 
 

 
 
Connecticut River Watershed Council
GUIDE BOOK

        If you intend to paddle all or part of the Connecticut River, you should purchase the latest guide book.  The Connecticut River Watershed Council has carefully written this book and it is now in it's third edition.

THE CONNECTICUT RIVER BOATING GUIDE
SOURCE TO SEA
By John Sinton, Elizabeth Farnsworth, and Wendy Sinton
ISBN-13: 978-0-7627-4097-0