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Hoosic River Reach 7

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Last Updated: 10/2017
STATISTICS

Skill Level:            Class 1 & 2 in small sections
Estimated Time:    3 hours plus half hour for portage.
Distance:               8.0 miles
USGS Map:  North Pownal VT, Pownal, VT
 Lincoln Street Launch to Indian Massacre Road Bridge
 
Description 
        ​

Mile 41.3 - Lincoln Street Launch - Take-Out. Near the center of Pownal

Mile 38.7 -Tannery Dam Take-Out.  Take-out on river right above the dam barrier.  Climb up to the railroad tracks and follow them down river for about 0.2 miles.  Take the time in the small park to read the history of the Tannery that once operated along the river.  Cross over the river on the Furlong Road bridge.  Put-In on the down river side of the bridge.

Mile 38.5 - Tannery Dam Put-In

Mile 33.3 Green Road and Indian Massacre Road Bridge Launch.
What indian massacre? It's irresistable!

Lincoln Street Launch - 41.3
Position: 42-46.15 N 73-14.60 W
Boat Launch:
Follow trail to Car-top launch from roadside parking. 
Nearest Address: 
26 Lincoln St, Pownal, VT 05261
Put-In Directions ( 5.0 miles, 9 minutes)
From the intersection of Route 7 and Route 2 in Williamstown, MA.  The Oval Traffic Circle.
  1. Take Route 7 North. Pass over the Hoosic River and across the state line into Vermont.
  2. At mile 4.2, turn left onto Vermont Route 346 North.
  3. At mile 4.8, when Route 346 turns right, continue straight onto Main Street.
  4. At mile 4.9, just before the Hoosic River, turn right onto Lincoln Street.
  5. At mile 5.0, across from private homes on your right, park roadside, unload your boat, and carry your boat down the trail that has no signage to the river.
If you have trouble finding this trail, you're not alone.
The Brimmer Massacre in 1755
               During the French and Indian War, the settlers in the Hoosick Valley were burned out by war parties on their way to and from Massachusetts. They always had to be on the lookout for the enemy. Mr. John G. Brimmer was at work in his fields with his three sons. Finding an Indian blanket, the father told his sons to get the horse team and head to the main house. As Jeremiah mounted his horse, he was struck by a fatal bullet. Godfrey and Jonathan immediately seized their guns and ran to a brush fence. The Indians found them and after a very short battle, the two sons were captured. 
         The two boys were marched to St. Johns, Canada. As they were about to be killed, they were spared when an old Indian hunter recognized them as the family that helped him when he was in the Hoosick area. Six weeks later, they were sold as slaves to French officers. After the fall of Quebec in 1759, the boys escaped but were captured by the British near Fort Ticonderoga. Patroon Stephen Van Rensselaer obtained their release. They made their way to Albany and then to their family living in Rhinebeck-on-the-Hudson. The family moved back to the valley where a branch of the family lived for 200 years before the farm was sold. The seven generations were listed with name and birth year by Mrs. Sweet. 

                 For more information click the link below:
Hoosick History
Tannery Dam Portage - 38.7 to 38.5
Take-Out Position: 42-47.71 N 73-15.75 W
Put-In Position: 42-47.82 N 73-15.95 W
Boat Launch:
Roadside car-top launch down river of bridge. 
Nearest Address: 
5 Furlong Road, Pownal, VT 05261 (at Bridge)
Put-In Directions ( 7.4 miles, 12 minutes)
From the intersection of Route 7 and Route 2 in Williamstown, MA.  The Oval Traffic Circle.
  1. Take Route 7 North. Pass over the Hoosic River and across the state line into Vermont.
  2. At mile 4.2, turn left onto Vermont Route 346 North.
  3. At mile 7.2, turn left onto Furlong Road. There is long white house on the left and a group of warehouses on the right.
  4. Cross the railroad tracks and the bridge.  Pull over on the right and carry down to the river to launch.
Go over the bridge, turn right and park, and follow the trail to the river.
Tannery Dam
               The Pownal Dam is located in North Pownal, Vermont. Based on a draft Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) prepared by the Johnson Company in 2009, the dam supplied power to the former Pownal Tannery, and is currently inactive. The intake was constructed in 1955 to replace an existing dam intake structure. The Pownal Tannery operated from the 1930s to the 1988. It later filed for bankruptcy. With the exception of a landfill located upgradient of the dam, the majority of tannery operations and structures were located downstream of the dam. Lagoons were located further downstream of the former tannery structures. The former Pownal Tannery is listed on the EPA’s National Priorities List (NPL), but the dam is not listed on any searched database. The dam site is owned by the Town of Pownal. The Johnson Company summarized previous investigations of the Pownal Tannery Superfund site, some of which included sediment sampling offsite, near the dam. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and metals were determined to be the contaminants of concern for the surficial river sediments located upstream of the dam. Low levels of dioxins and pesticides were also detected in surficial offsite river sediments.
                 For more information click the link below:
Hoosic River Hydro
The current dam was built in 1955 by Charles Kokoras
Green Road and Indian Massacre Road Bridge Launch - 33.3
Position: 42-49.60 N 73-19.31 W
Boat Launch:
Informal car-top launch. 
Nearest Address: 
332 Indian Massacre Rd, Petersburg, NY 12138
Put-In Directions ( 11.1 miles, 16 minutes)
From the intersection of Route 7 and Route 2 in Williamstown, MA.  The Oval Traffic Circle.
  1. Take Route 7 North. Pass over the Hoosic River and across the state line into Vermont.
  2. At mile 4.2, turn left onto Vermont Route 346 North.
  3. At mile 8.8, cross the New York State Line.
  4. At mile 10.8, turn right onto Green Road.
  5. Cross over railroad track and the bridge over the river.
  6. At mile 11.1, pull over after crossing the bridge.  Informal launch on up stream side of the bridge.
A view from bridge looking down stream.
A view from the bridge looking up stream.